Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains
Survey: Mountains

Survey: Mountains

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  • T&M 2021
  • Softcover, 1st edition
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The Internet has become a part of our daily lives, we live with all kinds of "images" through many types of  mediums. Therefore, it may be obvious that the "photograph" of a few decades ago is completely different from the "photograph" of today. Yoshida explores the possibilities of photography in the present in a variety of ways.

In this series, "Survey: Mountains," Yoshida approaches the subject of mountains.
She explored (surveyed) mountains through a complex combination of photographic processes, such as searching for images on the Internet, researching in a virtual space on Google Maps, and actually visiting the site to take photographs. Even the same mountain can be seen and perceived differently depending on the angle and method of approach. Also, the aspect of the mountain that Yoshida presented in her exhibition changed each time. Through the accumulation of many attempts, Yoshida formed the "mountain".

In this book, Yoshida has compiled not only photographs that she collected or actually took, but also photographs of the exhibition installation view. Cultural researcher Hiroki Yamamoto has also contributed to the book. This is a book that questions the way we look at the world today and the way images should be.

ーーー

I look for somewhere I want to go, by searching for information and images, maps and aerial photographs on the internet, then photograph on-screen the images that come up, and armed with these, make my way to the actual location.

Sometimes that place is smaller than I imagined from the information gleaned earlier. Or perhaps the topography has changed. If occasionally I feel let down in this way, on other occasions I stumble upon scenes more stunning than anything I envisaged. And sometimes I gain nothing at all from the journey.

Just as lava accumulates to make a huge mountain, mountains photographed in various places accumulate on my little hard disk, forming an imaginary mountain.

In a space overflowing with mountain images and information, I felt the weight of an actual mountain, a mountain that surely ought not to be there. The task of giving shape to non-existent ground to define the contours of a mountain, is exactly like surveying.

− Shiho Yoshida